FLEET FORMATION

FLEET FORMATION

Very unusual, tightly aligned aerosols are photographed together and attached to this page. The spray lines are all in parallel, and are shown close up and later starting to spread out.
‘MEGASPRAYER’ NUMBER 4 CAPTURED

‘MEGASPRAYER’ NUMBER 4 CAPTURED

This set of photos shows aerosol emissions extending across the entire wingspan of a McDonnell Douglas MD80 aircraft on November 30, 1999 in Santa Fe, New Mexico . This aircraft has rear mounted engines, showing that this wide span of aerosols cannot be emanating from the engines alone. These pictures show the same entire wingspan results that have been witnessed in previous Carnicom papers named THIRD ‘MEGASPRAYER’ CAPTURED (September 9, 1999), NEW CHEMTRAIL SPRAY SYSTEM REVEALED (August 14, 1999), and NEW CHEMTRAIL SPRAY SYSTEM CONFIRMED (August 14, 1999).
THIRD ‘MEGASPRAYER’ CAPTURED

THIRD ‘MEGASPRAYER’ CAPTURED

Yet a third telephoto set, this one from Santa Fe, New Mexico on September 9, 1999 depicts a full length wing spray system. This plane appears to be a Boeing 757, with the majority of aircraft during spraying conditions appear to be of the Boeing 757 class, but a revision will be warranted is additional information is provided or becomes available. If anyone can identify this model of aircraft, it would be appreciated if you could contact the Carnicom Institute email at info@carnicominstitute.org with any such helpful identifying information.
NEW AEROSOL SPRAY SYSTEM REVEALED

NEW AEROSOL SPRAY SYSTEM REVEALED

A heavy spraying of Santa Fe Santa Fe, New Mexico on August 14, 1999 revealed uniquely thick and dense aerosol sprays coming from one particular aircraft among many planes observed spraying. Photographs taken of this aircraft and attached to this paper appear to show this plane’s spray encompassing the full wing span of the aircraft, indicating a new method of spray delivery that involves multiple trails emanating from multiple nozzles on the wing assemblies. Trails can be seen originating from the center of the plane, precluding the possibility of normal engine contrail association with this aircraft.
NORMAL CONTRAIL PHOTOGRAPHS (2)

NORMAL CONTRAIL PHOTOGRAPHS (2)

Notice the dissipation of the trail within approximately a 30 second interval. The camera was held stationary on the contrail after the plane passed. Notice that none of the trails are coming directly from the tail of the airplane.
HOW TO PHOTOGRAPH AN AEROSOL PLANE

HOW TO PHOTOGRAPH AN AEROSOL PLANE

Recommendations for an adequate camera setup is presented here that will give quality pictures of chemplanes that can be used as further proof that these aerosol programs are real. Conditions are also explored as to how to get optimum timing for these pictures. Discussed are cameras, zoom lenses and teleconverters. Pictures from witnesses that show the various spray types are welcome at the Carnicom Institute.