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CAUTIONS AGAINST
PREMATURE CONCLUSIONS
Clifford E Carnicom
April 06 2001

 

It is advised that all researchers, journalists and citizens be cautious against drawing any premature conclusions regarding the specific purposes or agendas of aircraft aerosol operations currently in progress throughout the United States and global regions. It is imperative that any analysis be consistent with all available and observed data, and that no single agenda be declared as an end purpose prior to comprehensive examination. Any efforts to identify specific elements or compounds involved within the operations must satisfy a wide range of criteria and conditions that have been established from the research efforts of numerous individuals.

 

Some of these criteria and conditions which are expected to be satisfied include the following:

 

1. Aerosol material size is extremely small, expected to be in the size range from sub-micron to several microns in size. See previous study.
2. Materials are expected to be hygroscopic, i.e., water loving (e.g., some metallic salt forms), in nature.
See previous study.
3. Materials are expected to be ionizable by visible light or near ultra-violet wavelenths.
See previous study.
4. Materials are expected to possess a fairly high degree of solubility.
See previous study.
5. Materials are expected to be alkaline in nature.
See previous study.
6. Particulate aerosol materials are visible under specific lighting conditions.
See previous report.
7. Particulate aerosol materials exhibit electrically charged (ionized) motion.
See previous report.
8. Electromagnetic energy absorption characteristics of candidate particulate matter must be reviewed as a function of particle size, element type, and wavelength. Expected behavior across the electromagnetic spectrum must be analytically evaluated, including but not limited to radio waves, microwave (e.g., radar), visible, and x-rays wavelengths. Characteristics of absorption of electromagnetic energy within the microwave portion (e.g., radar) of the spectrum may be of particular interest.
See previous study.
9. Visible particulate matter must be chemically identified.
See previous report.
10. Spectrometry data indicating the presence of unexpected elements must be considered.
See previous study.
11. Relative humidity studies and particulate water absorption characteristics must be considered.
See previous study.
12. pH rainfall data results, indicating a significant increase in soluble hydroxides must be incorporated with any analysis.
See previous study.
13. Electrolysis examination of rainfall samples must be conducted and provide results that are consistent with an observed increase in alkalinity (increased ionic distribution).
See previous report.
14. Fibrous materials, sub-micron in width, repeatedly documented and associated with aircraft aerosol operations must be thoroughly analyzed. The failure of the United States Environmental Agency to acknowledge the certified receipt of said material for testing and identification must be included within that investigation. Biological components later found to exist within those same samples must be professionally evaluated.
See previous report.
15. The repeated identification of biological components within numerous atmospheric samples that span both time and geographic separation must be accounted for. Professional examination is a requirement.
See previous report.
16. A comprehensive consideration of both electromagnetic and biological aspects with respect to the accumulated observations and data must take place.
See previous report.
17. Analytical models that have been developed describing conventional vapor trail formation, distance span and dissipation must be compared to repeated conflicts within observations. See previous studies
1,2,3.
18. Health effects that are being reported are to be considered in their totality in conjunction with their probable causes and sources.
19. The repeated failure of civil, military, and media officials to adequately address the legitimate citizen concerns and calls for formal investigation of widespread and well documented aerosol activities must be accounted for.
See previous record.

 

Each of the above criteria or conditions must be considered prior to any declaration of purpose or agenda that is presumed to fully explain the aircraft aerosol operations in progress. No chemical elements or compounds are beyond examination within the current investigation, and none have been entirely excluded at this time; special attention is being given to certain elements of Groups I and II of the periodic table because they satisfy many of the considerations listed above. More than one type or mode of operation is to be considered as a likelihood. All researchers, journalists, and citizens are urged to explore each of the above issues in detail to reach a comprehensive assessment of the operations underway. In order to serve the broader long term mutual goals of full disclosure and accountability of the events being witnessed, premature statements of composition and purpose will need to be avoided. I will continue to submit an appeal for broad-based participation and investigation by professionals, researchers, journalists, public officials and citizens to address and resolve the urgent and serious claims now before us.

 


Clifford E Carnicom
April 06 2001

 

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CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 CAUTIONS AGAINST PREMATURE CONCLUSIONS by Carnicom Institute is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.