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This paper is Part Four of a Five Part series.

This paper will describe the use of various analytical laboratory techniques, with an emphasis upon electrochemistry, to assess the chemical nature of protein(s) that have been identified within the blood sample discussed in the preceding report.  The methods of use have been described in the paper Blood Alteration II : Means & Methods and will not be repeated at length here.  The focus of this paper will be the presentation of the end results of analysis.

AC Voltammetry is a method of primary use here; this method will seek to identify specific chemical constituents that are subject to oxidation and reduction when subjected to a combination of DC and AC current.  The reactions identified are of great value in identifying ionic chemical constituents within the blood sample.  It has been already established that the nature of the blood has been transformed, is dominated by the existence of the cross-domain bacteria (CDB) microbial life form, and that foreign proteins are consequently within the blood sample after exposure to low magnitude DC electrical current.  Please refer to the paper Blood Alteration III : Transformation for this precedent.

An AC voltammogram characteristic of this recent work is shown below:

 


Representative AC Voltammogram – Blood Sample Analysis
Carnicom Institute

As mentioned, many of the protocols established for the work underway are original in design.  Some of the aspects that are important to the method include:

1. The electrode configuration employed (graphite electrodes are under use here).

2. The two sets of current profiles are due to a reversal in current polarity.

3. The blood sample is a dynamic environment when subjected to current; this accounts for the variation in each profile within the particular electrode polarization used.

4. A typical analysis session might involve the collection of 10-30 electrochemical profiles for a sample.

5. Each individual profile typically requires 3-10 minutes of time to complete.  One session therefore might easily involve several hours of work of data collection.

6. The work was repeated on numerous occasions for each type of sample or blood transformation encountered; ultimately several weeks of steady work was devoted to analysis of the blood sample.  The sample here is the same as that reported in the paper Alteration of Blood III : Transformation.

7. Considerable effort has been devoted to the analysis of control samples where the nature of the sample is known prior to analysis; examples of this would include known proteins in solution and variations in water samples including “distilled” water(not as “pure” as many might think).

8. The methods developed have demonstrated themselves to be reasonably sensitive, with parts per million (ppm) capability being expected in most cases.

9. Concentration of the sample examined is an important factor; AC Voltammetry is sufficiently sensitive that very small concentrations in solution are normally required.

10. Reference oxidation – reduction tables are available to assist in the identification of specific chemical constituents likely to be present.  Such tables vary in their comprehensiveness and both simplified and detailed listings both have value in terms of assessing the likelihood of existence of a chemical species.

11. The primary method of identification involves the very careful and detailed analysis of each profile collected over time in a dynamic environment.  This analysis is dependent primarily upon the peaks or inflection changes in the profile (essentially first derivative analysis).  With adequate attention to detail, subtle detection of chemical constituents is a major benefit inherent in AC voltammetry; this is especially true in the domain of organic chemistry.

12.  Repeatability of the results achieved is a trademark motive of the methods that have been developed in this work.  The transformed blood sample is indeed a complex and dynamic environment when subjected to electrochemical energy.  Substantial devotion of time and effort has been made to achieve this confidence in the work reported here.

13. The primary end goal of the work is the determination of the likelihood of  existence of a chemical species within the transformed blood or known protein.  Any results here should be considered as another “stepping stone” that builds upon the work that has been accomplished in previous decades.

14. Comparison of the results found here with previous work that uses dozens of additional analytical techniques is important to this corroboration process.

15. Additional analytical techniques, such as those mentioned in the Blood Alteration II : Means & Method paper are also critical in the protocols that have been used and developed here to analyze the transformed blood sample.

The results of the protein analysis by AC voltammetry electrochemical methods will be summarized here.  Redundant trials were conducted leading to the same general results.  At this point the proteins evaluated should be considered as foreign to blood, and not expected to be present within blood in any sense.  Previous papers in this series provide adequate justification for this statement.  The full course of studies conducted are stated in detail within CI Laboratory Notebooks Vol 26 and 27, and mentioned on several occasions on this site and in this research paper series.

It bears repeating that there are two separate layers of materials that develop from application of the electrical current : first, the foam-precipitate material at the top of the vial and then secondly, the bright red layer that settles to the bottom.  Both layers exhibit a predominance of the cross-domain microbial life form within the blood, also described previously within the paper series.  The chemical constituents identified will therefore be listed separately for each layer, and overlap can therefore be established even though the gross physical appearance of each layer is distinct from one another.  This work is offered to signal to formal laboratories the chemical constituents that are likely to be identified within blood samples, as well as are likely to be associated with the blood coagulation phenomena reported at the onset of this series.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Blood Subjected to Electrical Current:
Foam Precipitate Candidate Chemical Constituents:

1. Halogens (Cl, Fl, Br, I)

2. Peroxide (H202,oxidizer)

3. Hydrazoic Acid (HN3)

4. Electrolytes (Na, Ca, Mg, etc.)

5. Metals in ionic form (Fe, Al, Mn)

6. Nitrogen & Sulfur compounds

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Blood Subjected to Electrical Current:
Settled Layer Candidate Chemical Constituents:

1. Halogens (Cl, Br)

2. Peroxide (H202,oxidizer)

3. Phosphate compound (H3PO4)

4. Metals in ionic form (Ca, Fe, Mg, Al)

5. Hydrazoic Acid (HN3)

6. Iron – cyanide complex [Fe(CN6)]

5. Metals in ionic form (Fe, Al, Mn)

6. Nitrogen & Sulfur compounds

_______________________________________________________________________________________

An extended paper could be written on the implications of many of the above compounds existing in blood; this will not be completed or repeated here.  Brief comments will be made.  To establish the precedent for discussion, each of these terms can be searched within the historical record of research of Carnicom Institute.  Some of the references found will include:

1. Halogens:

With the exception of iodine, the halogens are serious toxic agents in the body.  Disruption of iodine in the body also, however, is a serious issue and affects the functioning of the thyroid in major ways including general metabolism.

Precedent references:

1. Carnicom Institute Newsletter – Summer 2019 (Jul 2019)

2. Morgellons : A Supplemental Discussion, (Jan 2017)

3. A Week in the Life of Carnicom Institute (May 2016)

4. Tertiary Rainwater Analysis : Questions of Toxicity (Nov 2015)

5. Preliminary Rainwater Analysis : Aluminum Concentration (Nov 2015)

6. CDB Lipids : An Introductory Analysis (Mar 2015)

7. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part III – Potential Mitigating Strategies (Dec 2013) [EMPHASIS UPON THIS PAPER]

8. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part II – Potential Health Impacts of the Various Functional Groups and Components (Dec 2013) [EMPHASIS UPON THIS PAPER]

9. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part I – Identification (Dec 2013) [EMPHASIS UPON THIS PAPER]

10. Carnicom Institute : Index of Laboratory Notebooks (Vol 1-25)

11. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 172)

 

2. Oxidation:

The issue of oxidation equivalently receives priority attention within the historical research of Carnicom Institute.   The same for anti-oxidants.

Precedent references:

1.  Carnicom Institute Newsletter – Summer 2019 (Jul 2019)

2. The Discovery of Thiocyanates within the Cross-Domain Bacteria (Jun 2018)

3. Morgellons : A Supplemental Discussion, (Jan 2017)

4.  Preliminary Rainwater Analysis : Aluminum Concentration (Nov 2015)

5. CDB Lipids : An Introductory Analysis (Mar 2015)

6. CDB : Growth Progressions (Jun 2014)

7. Biofilm, CDB and Vitamin C (Apr 2014)

8. Growth Inhibition Achieved (Jan 2014)

9. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part III – Potential Mitigating Strategies (Dec 2013) [EMPHASIS UPON THIS PAPER]

10. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part II – Potential Health Impacts of the Various Functional Groups and Components (Dec 2013) [EMPHASIS UPON THIS PAPER]

11. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part I – Identification (Dec 2013) [EMPHASIS UPON THIS PAPER]

12. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis – Introduction (Dec 2013)

13. Morgellons : The Breaking of Bonds and the Reduction of Iron (Nov 2012)

14. Amino Acids Verified (Nov 2012)

15. Morgellons : A Thesis (Oct 2011)

16. Morgellons : In the Laboratory (May 2011)

17. Morgellons : The Extent of the Problem (Jun 2010)

18. Morgellons : Growth Inhibition Confirmed (Mar 2010)

19. Morgellons : A Discovery and a Proposal (Feb 2010)

20. Artificial Blood(?) (Aug 2009) [Note that a search for research papers on blood will bring up an extensive list of relevant papers to this paper as well.]

(Partial Listing:)
21. Carnicom Institute : Index of Laboratory Notebooks (Vol 1-25)

22. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2017, Vol 18, Page 297)

23. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 98)

24. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 195)

25. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 158)

26. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2009, Vol 1, Page 60)

27. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 235)

28. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Sep 2017, Vol 21, Page 255)

29. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Sep 2017, Vol 21, Page 258)

30. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 157)

31. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2009, Vol 1, Page 97)

32. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 100)

33. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2017, Vol 18, Page 94)

34. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2017, Vol 18, Page 204)

35. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 10)

36. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 16)

37. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 236)

38. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2009, Vol 1, Page 97)

39. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2009, Vol 1, Page 100)

40. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 39)

41.CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 157)

42. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 98)

43. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 280)

44. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2015, Vol 9, Page 178)

45. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Aug 2016, Vol 16, Page 183)

46. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2015, Vol 9, Page 207)

47. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 19)

48. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2017, Vol 18, Page 203)

49. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Sep 2016, Vol 17, Page 76)

50. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2015, Vol 9, Page 182)

51. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 108)

52. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 120)

53. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 94)

54. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 18)

55. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2009, Vol 1, Page 122)

56. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 10)

57. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 16)

58. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 236)

59. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2009, Vol 1, Page 59)

60. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 174)

61. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 195)

62. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 82)

63. CI Laboratory Notebooks – Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 151)

64. CI Laboratory Notebooks – Jul 2011 Vol 3, Page 102)

65. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 204)

66. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 90)

67. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 122)

68. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 123)

69. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jul 2011, Vol 3, Page 101)

70. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 264)

71. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 282)

72. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 122)

73. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 283)

74. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 324)

75. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2017, Vol 18, Page 209)

76. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 23)

77. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 8, Page 156)

78. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 327)

79. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 16, Page 186)

80. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr 2017, Vol 18, Page 228)

81. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Feb 2010, Vol 2, Page 6)

 

3. HN3:

Hydrazoic acid (HN3) is a new candidate on the list within the approximate 25 year history of research.  It is also true that the recent electrochemical work is the most comprehensive and thorough study in inorganic analysis that has been conducted thus far.  The half-reaction under review here is:

3/2 N2 (g)  + H+  + e  - ->  HN3

If the existence of hydrazoic acid is confirmed as a product of the electrochemical process upon blood samples, it does represent a significant threat to human health at low concentrations.  It is a colorless liquid at room temperature and pressure.  It is toxic and is recorded to produce the following effects at 0.3ppm:

a) Under inhalation, it produces structural or functional changes in the alveoli and bronchi.

b) It causes changes in the central nervous system.

c) It causes change in the cardiac rate.

Study and trials of the nature recorded within this research series will need to be conducted to confirm or refute this finding.  Numerous repetition trials were performed to arrive at this candidate result, and the redox voltage encountered is unusual in its own right in comparison to most reactions (-3.33V).  If any direct information contrary to this finding becomes available, it will be evaluated and integrated within this report as is appropriate.

 

4. Electrolytes:

Common electrolytes such as sodium, magnesium, and calcium are anticipated to be in blood.  Concentrations and ratios of such electrolytes, however, are a very worthy enterprise of study either before or after being subjected to the electrochemical process.

 

5. Metals:

An excess of aluminum within the body is not regarded with favor, as is now commonly known.  As always, concentration is a paramount consideration.  Unnecessary environmental exposure is established to be detrimental and some relevant CI research papers are at hand:

1. Preliminary Rainwater Analysis : Aluminum Concentration (Nov 2015)

2. Global Validation (Nov 2017)

3. Environmental Filament Project : Metals Testing Laboratory Report (Aug 2017)

4. Morgellons : A Supplemental Discussion, (Jan 2017)

5. The Demise of Rainwater (Jun 2016)

6. Tertiary Rainwater Analysis : Questions of Toxicity (Nov 2015)

7. Secondary Rainwater Analysis : Organics & Inorganics (Nov 2015)

8. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part III – Potential Mitigating Strategies (Dec 2013)

9. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part II – Potential Health Impacts of the Various Functional Groups and Components (Dec 2013)

10. Morgellons : A Natural Medicine Approach (Jan 2008)

11. Calcium and Potassium (Mar 2005)

12. Natural Medicine for the Times (May 2003)

13. Drought Inducement (Apr 2002)

14. The Expected Composition (May 2002)

15. Aerosols and Magnetism – Interview (Nov 2001)

16. Rainwater Samples : MIcroscope Views II (Aug 2001)

17. Ionization Apparent (Feb 2001)

18. Carnicom Institute : Index of Laboratory Notebooks (Vol 1-25)

19. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 4, Page 126)

 

Iron is a fundamental and primary component of blood.  That says nothing, however, about the microbial disruption and chemical transformation of iron that is extensively documented within the research.  This alteration is at the heart of respiration and energy flow of the body and fundamental to life itself.  The CI literature on this issue is extensive and quite serious:

As there are conservatively more than 100 relevant research papers on the issue of iron on this site, they will not be listed here.  However, a search on the site listed below will provide sufficient material to begin this process of discovery:

1.  Carnicom Institute : Search Listing for Papers Relevant to Iron Disruption and Alteration (1999-2022)

In addition, the CI Laboratory Notebooks will demonstrate considerable devotion of effort towards this topic:

2.  Carnicom Institute : Index of Laboratory Notebooks (Vol 1-25)

As we do see a listing for an iron-cyanide complex, it is probably helpful to make brief mention of the cyanide – cyanate topic that is more deeply embedded in unpublished CI work.  In addition to the references below, this topic will also be found within the CI laboratory notebooks and the extensive infrared spectra library also now available on this site.

1. The Discovery of Thiocyanates within the Cross Domain Bacteria (Jun 2018)

2. A Point of Reckoning III (Oct 2017)

3. A Point of Reckoning II (Sep 2017)

4. Morgellons : A Supplemental Discussion, (Jan 2017)

5. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part III – Potential Mitigating Strategies (Dec 2013)

6. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part II – Potential Health Impacts of the Various Functional Groups and Components (Dec 2013)

7.  Morgellons : The Breaking of Bonds and the Reduction of Iron (Nov 2012)

8. Morgellons : A Thesis (Oct 2011)

It is to be mentioned that micro-scale pyrolysis of the CDB metabolic products may have produced a significant health reaction involving the neck-thyroid region of an individual.  Although not described in detail, the notes involving pyrolysis examination are detailed within CI Laboratory notebooks, along with concurrent gas chromatography study. This work is recorded primarily in volumes 11, 19. 20 and 22 of the laboratory notebooks.

9. Carnicom Institute : Index of Laboratory Notebooks (Vol 1-25)

Please also recall the series of devastating toxicology reports also involving micro-level solutions of CDB metabolic products applied to plants, protozoa and other life forms.  Genetic mutation is also evident within.

10. Morgellons Toxicity : A Continued Report (May 2019)

11. A Toxicology Study (Dec 2018)

12. Protozoa Motility and Mortality ( Dec 2018)

 

H3P04 – Phosphoric Acid

All of the listed constituents are of eventual significance.  H3PO4 is another example of such a compound; this is phosphoric acid.  This compound has been previously encountered within the work.  The record of this is deeply embedded within the laboratory notes more than it has been published publicly.   That identification of phosphoric acid represents a turning point in the evolution of the CDB culturing processes that evolved the years.  It required considerable work over the years to arrive at the conclusion of its existence within the CDB.

Phosphoric acid is able to weaken and damage teeth and bones.  An excess of phosphoric acid can lead to heart and kidney problems, muscle loss and osteoporosis.

The invesigation and role of phosphorus in the research history is partially enumerated below:

1. Morgellons : A Supplemental Discussion, (Jan 2017)

2. The Demise of Rainwater (Jun 2016)

3. A Week in the Life of Carnicom Institute (May 2016)

4.  Tertiary Rainwater Analysis : Questions of Toxicity (Nov 2015)

5. CDB Lipids : An Introductory Analysis (Mar 2015)

6. Morgellons : A Working Hypothesis Part I – Identification (Dec 2013)

7. Morgellons : A Thesis (Oct 2011)

8. Carnicom Institute : Index of Laboratory Notebooks (Vol 1-25)

9. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (May 2019, Vol 25, Page 250)

10. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Dec 2018, Vol 24, Page 271)

11. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Dec 2018, Vol 24, Page 281)

12. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Dec 2018, Vol 24, Page 226)

13. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Dec 2018, Vol 24, Page 227)

14. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jun 2018, Vol 23, Page 168)

15. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Aug 2016, Vol 16, Page 204)

16.CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jun 2018, Vol 23, Page 170)

17. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 04, Page 161)

18. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jan 2012, Vol 04, Page 163)

19 CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Jun 2018, Vol 23, Page 168)

20. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Dec 2018, Vol 24, Page 231)

21. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Dec 2018, Vol 24, Page 243)

22. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (May  2019, Vol 25, Page 249)

23. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Sep  2016, Vol 17, Page 41)

24. CI Laboratory Notebooks – (Apr  2017, Vol 18, Page 251)

 

Please preserve and  distribute this report globally as it develops.  Thank you.

To follow:

1. Electrochemical Results
2.. NIR results
3. Enzyme results
4. Previous corroboration

 

IN PROGRESS

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